quarta-feira, 28 de agosto de 2013

So I've taken my lazy self...

...And got down to the basics of Blender. Using my newly-acquired knowledge I remodelled the maze:

..and imported the result to Unity:

 After some tweaking, JavaScript, C# and a hell lot of time and luck, I wiped this out:
The Maze 3D Installer (.Exe, 9.7Mb)
Zip File (Extract to any location and run .Exe)

terça-feira, 7 de maio de 2013

Gravity Simulation

God it was a pleasure to code this!
I've always had a knack for physics, and to be able to combine that with physics is just amazing, which just makes it even better.
I have been on this for quite a while now, but the final version of the code (the draft was very messy) was quite quickly put together, since I already knew what to do.
I'll write on this project's details later (since there's a lot behind it), and it still has way too many rough edges, but I just couldn't wait to post it here:

(there's only one particle for now, even though I created a class, and if the distance between the attractor (contollable with the mouse) and the particle is zero, the latter will disappear (divide by 0 and stuff like that). If anything goes wrong, i.e. the particle disappears of goes out of the screen, go here and refresh the page. )




(P.S.: I particularly enjoy trying to make one orbit the other)

Source
Full Screen
Licença Creative Commons
GravitySimulation by MikeMakesGames is licensed under a Creative Commons Atribuição-Partilha nos termos da mesma licença 3.0 Unported License.

sábado, 27 de abril de 2013

Experiment #4


(Stand still and press any button)


This one was quite fun to do (and so was to watch the final result)! It does, however, require a webcam.

The process is quite simple:
-Flash gets Camera input and attaches it to a Video Object (which then displays)
-Then, when a key is pressed, a new BitmapData object is created, and the current camera image is attached to it.
-Each pixel's perceived brightness is calculated (it's not a very efficient method) through a neat equation I found on the Internet:



-If a pixel's Perceived Brightness is less than 0.35 (mind, a pixel's Perceived Brightness varies from 0, very dark, to 1, very bright), a black pixel with it's coordinates is drawn to the stage.

Source

As usual,

Licença Creative Commons

Experiment #4 by MikeMakesGames is licensed under a Creative Commons Atribuição-Partilha nos termos da mesma licença 3.0 Unported License.

quarta-feira, 20 de março de 2013

I have been busy!

I have spent the past few days modelling a small puzzle for a concept game I had. Basically, you would tilt the "box" (using a wiimote, which was possible to connect to Unity3D), and get the ball out -- simply a virtualization  of those small wooden puzzles you sometimes see in kids' shops.
However (and to my great annoyance, after many days of effort), I had a problem with the model's collision mesh. The collision mesh is, for those who don't know, a sort of metadata of the model. As you can imagine, it is processor-heavy for a PC to calculate and look for collisions everywhere. Also, it might be that the whole model isn't solid (imagine a window, through which, for game purposes, the player can go through)  The collision mesh solves those problems, as it indicates where the model is solid (and thus where to look for collisions).
Now, I'm really no expert in moddeling -- far from it. So I use Google's (Trimble's now, I think) SketchUp 8. It's a fairly simple tool and serves its purpose well. Unfortunately, it's hardly game-ready modelling oriented. As such, when I exported the model, and re-imported it into Unity3D, the result was one hell of a mess. The ball would go through the model, and everything looked ugly. My lack of experience working on Unity didn't help, and I basically gave up. Seriously, I think it's beyond repair (and I'm definitely not going to do it all over again).
Not felling like putting all the work to waste, I'll just post a picture here, and the .skp file (SketchUp) available for download (under no license, if anyone can fix it, it's theirs. Seriously, I am so done with that model).

Download .skp





domingo, 17 de fevereiro de 2013

Experiment #3


The program detects the number of dark and light pixels in the webcam image, determining wether it is dark or not.


Licença Creative Commons



Experiment #3 by MikeMakesGames is licensed under a Creative Commons Atribuição-Partilha nos termos da mesma licença 3.0 Unported License.

Source